Now Recruiting

Pregnancy and Sleep Quality Study

You may be able to improve your sleep and quality of Life

For more information, contact: Ms. Zohre German (Study Coordinator) 214-828-8291 or german@tamu.edu  

Consider participating in a research study using oral appliance therapy to treat snoring, improve sleep and breathing.
Texas A&M University College of Dentistry researchers are conducting a pilot study on the effectiveness of an oral appliance to improve sleep quality, breathing & snoring.

Snoring can be a serious problem that can affect your health and that of your developing child. It is associated with poor quality sleep, high blood pressure, heart disease, preeclampsia and preterm delivery.

Eligibility: If you are pregnant, at least 18 years old, and snore, and have adequate dental health to wear an oral appliance, you may qualify.

Requirements: The study is 5-weeks long and requires regular visits to the Texas A&M University College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX. The study involves doing home sleep tests for at least 6 nights, & wearing an oral appliance at night for 4 weeks.

Benefits, Risks & Compensation: Potential benefits include reduction of snoring; improved breathing and sleep quality.

Potential risks & discomforts are minimal. Compensation of $150 will be provided and you will be able to keep the custom-fitted oral appliance at the completion of the study. There is no cost to you to participate.

Study Title: Oral Appliance Therapy for Improving Sleep Quality during Pregnancy: A Controlled Clinical Trial

Principal Investigators: Dr. Emet Schneiderman, eschneiderman@tamu.edu, Dr. Preetam Schramm, schramm@tamu.edu  

Funded by: The Baylor Oral Health Foundation and Airway Management Inc.

For more information, contact: Ms. Zohre German (Study Coordinator) 214-828-8291 or german@tamu.edu  

Download a flyer

IRB NUMBER: 2018-0048-CD-EXP IRB APPROVAL DATE: 05/24/2018


myTAP Study: Trial to Reduce Snoring & Mouth Breathing During Sleep

screen-shot-2020-11-09-at-11.58.00-am.pngYou may be eligible to participate in a research study using oral appliance therapy to treat snoring, mouth breathing and improve your sleep and quality of life.

For more information, contact: Ms. Zohre German (Study Coordinator) 214-828-8291 or german@tamu.edu  

Texas A&M University College of Dentistry researchers are conducting a pilot study on the effectiveness of an oral appliance in improving oral health, breathing and cardiovascular function.

Snoring can be a serious problem that can affect heart and brain health, as well as blood pressure. Mouth breathing can harm oral health and contribute to developing dental caries & periodontal problems.

Eligibility: If you wake up with dry mouth & snore, are at least 18 years old and have at least 8 teeth per dental arch to support a dental oral appliance, you may qualify.

Requirements: This is an 8 to 12 week study that requires up to 6 visits to the TAMU College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX. It involves wearing an oral appliance every night and sleep tests for up to 11 nights over this period. You will also receive up to 5 periodontal exams over this period.

Benefits, Risks and Compensation: Potential benefits include reduction of snoring, improved breathing and sleep quality. Potential risks and discomforts are minimal. You will be able to keep the custom-fitted oral appliances at the completion of the study. There is no cost to you to participate.

Study Title: Effects of myTAP oral appliance therapy on cardio-respiratory dynamics in mouth-breathers who snore. IRB#2019-0421-CD-FB Approved 07/26/19

Principal Investigators: Dr. Emet Schneiderman, eschneiderman@tamu.edu, Dr. Preetam Schramm, schramm@tamu.edu 

For more information, contact:
Ms. Zohre German (Study Coordinator)
214-828-8291 or german@tamu.edu 

Completed Studies

Schneiderman E, Schramm P, Hui J, Wilson PD, Moura P, German Z, McCann A, Newton M. Randomized Trial of 2 Self-Titrated Oral Appliances for Airway Management. Journal of Dental Research. 2020 Sep:22034520956977. DOI: 10.1177/0022034520956977.
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022034520956977 

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There are no other clinical trials or studies requiring participants at this time.